Sunday 28 May 2017

British Red Cross thanks Jersey family firm for £7,000 Liberation donation

Thursday 02 July 2015

British Red Cross thanks Jersey family firm for £7,000 Liberation donation

The British Red Cross in Jersey is saying thank you to a local family for its generous donation of £7,000 to mark the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Channel Islands and the life-saving work of the Red Cross during the occupation.

In recognition of the difference made to islanders by the food parcels supplied by the Canadian and New Zealand Red Cross during the Second World War, the Clarke family (who own Le Masurier, one of Jersey’s longest-established companies) is making the £7,000 donation.

The Normandy landings in June 1944 meant the occupied islands were cut off from mainland Europe leaving islanders in a desperate situation. The SS Vega docked in St Helier on 30 December 1944 with much-needed supplies such as food, soap and medication. The Red Cross also operated a postal message system helping people to communicate with friends and relatives across the water.

Bev Dallas-Chapman, senior community fundraiser for the British Red Cross in Jersey, said: “We are extremely grateful to the Clarke family for this generous donation which will go towards our work around the world helping people to prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies, disasters and conflicts. As demonstrated by the support provided by the Canadian and New Zealand Red Cross during the Second World war the British Red Cross is part of the global Red Cross and Red Crescent humanitarian network and refuses to ignore people in crisis.”

In this 70th anniversary year of the liberation of Jersey, the Clarke family, owners of Le Masurier, say they are delighted to be making a £7,000 donation to the Red Cross.

John Clarke, Tony Clarke and Barbara Clarke, the wife of the late Fred Clarke, say: “This donation is in special recognition to the Red Cross and Order of St John of Canada and New Zealand. The generosity from the people of those countries contributed so much to the relief of islanders from starvation in 1944/45." 

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