Tuesday 29 November 2022
Select a region
News

St. John’s Manor sold to “appropriate” family

St. John’s Manor sold to “appropriate” family

Monday 17 February 2020

St. John’s Manor sold to “appropriate” family

Monday 17 February 2020


One of Jersey’s most iconic properties has changed hands for the first time in more than four decades, sold to what estate agents described as an “appropriate, Jersey-based" family.

The sale of St. John’s Manor was finalised on Friday, more than two years after the historic property was originally put on the market.

It was originally put up for sale with an asking price of £22 million, but was knocked down by as much as £4.5 million after going more than 18 months without interest despite numerous promotional features in high-profile national publications.

Announcing the sale in a now-deleted sponsored Facebook post over the weekend, agents Wilsons Knight Frank did not share the final sum paid for the prestigious property. 

stjohnsmanor.jpg

Pictured: The Facebook post announcing the sale, which has since been deleted.

They did confirm, however, that it had been sold to what they described as an “appropriate" family based in Jersey.

The high-value estate agents added that they considered the new owners would be “the perfect custodians of this historical and beautiful country estate, transacted for the first time in nearly 43 years”.

The 58-acre island palace was previously the home of John Dick, the Canada-born Rwandan consul, businessman, and Seigneur de St John.

He came to Jersey around four decades ago, acquiring the impressive property and separately the title, which is ‘Saint Jean de Hougue Boete’ in full.

One of the Channel Islands’ most prestigious country estates, St. John’s Manor comprises a large secluded manor housed in acres of landscaped gardens, and accessible via a sweeping drive behind a gate.

In its outdoor area, the estate boasts a serpentine, a wildlife lake, a Japanese water garden – and even its own falconry.

st_john_manor.jpeg

Pictured: An aerial view of the 58-acre St John Manor. (Google Maps)

The grounds are also home to a tennis court with a 'leisure pavilion' featuring its own gym, as well as a swimming pool and enclosed squash court.

Horse stables and “extensive” garaging are also provided, as well as a walled flower and produce garden.

The properties on site are no less impressive. The main attraction – a centuries-old manor house – has six bedrooms, five of which are suites.

It also includes several traditional reception rooms with finely-decorated ceilings and wood panelling, as well as a study and office suite.

These are complimented by two guest lodges – one of which features a sitting room, kitchen and dining space, double bedroom and bathroom, and the other with two double bedrooms – and a detached estate manager’s house. This alone is above the size of an average family home, with three to four bedrooms. 

pjimage-13.jpg

Pictured: The property has strong links to the island’s past, dating all the way to the 1300s. (Island Wiki) 

The ‘Hougue Boete’ estate name is thought to be linked with a family named Boet or Boiste, who held property in the parish as far back as 1331 or even earlier. It’s thought that the waterways date back to the days when St. John remained accessible by boat.

Since then, it’s passed through numerous well-known island families, including the Lemprieres, who held it from the 1300s to 1500s, and the Journeaux, Le Febvre, de Carteret, Le Maistre, Syvret and Le Couteur families.

More recently, the manor has occasionally been opened up to islanders for charity events. It is unknown whether the purchasers will continue this tradition.

READ MORE...

To the (St. John) manor born... For £22million

£4.5m discount as iconic manor goes unsold

Sign up to newsletter

 

Comments

Comments on this story express the views of the commentator only, not Bailiwick Publishing. We are unable to guarantee the accuracy of any of those comments.

Once your comment has been submitted, it won’t appear immediately. There is no need to submit it more than once. Comments are published at the discretion of Bailiwick Publishing, and will include your username.

There are no comments for this article.

To place a comment please login

You have landed on the Bailiwick Express website, however it appears you are based in . Would you like to stay on the site, or visit the site?