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FOCUS: Fifth of unemployed adults in Jersey have a degree

FOCUS: Fifth of unemployed adults in Jersey have a degree

Tuesday 02 August 2022

FOCUS: Fifth of unemployed adults in Jersey have a degree

Tuesday 02 August 2022


One in five unemployed adults in Jersey aged 16 to 64 have a degree qualification or higher, the latest Census has revealed.

More jobless hold a degree than no formal qualifications, with 17% of the 2,019 adults who were unemployed and looking for work on 21 March 2021 having no qualifications.

In total, four-fifths (83%) of adults aged 16-64 who were unemployed hold some form of educational qualification, a similar proportion to that of all adults aged 16-64 (85%).

Nine out of ten unemployed adults in the 20-24 age group had higher or secondary-level qualifications.

Census 2021 Unemployment Education.jpeg

CLICK TO ENLARGE: Highest level of educational qualification for unemployed adults aged 16-64.

By contrast, around a quarter (27%) of unemployed adults in the 60-64 age group did not possess any formal qualifications.

The recently published bulletin giving more details of the 2021 Census focuses on education.

Almost of third (28%) of all working-age adults and 42% of all adults have a degree-level or equivalent qualification. 

In contrast around one in seven (15%) had no formal qualifications.

To allow comparison with the island’s northern neighbour, 45% of adults aged 21-64 in Jersey held some form of higher-level qualification compared to 42% in the UK. 

However, the proportion of adults aged 21-64 in Jersey with no formal qualifications (15%) was greater than that recorded for the UK (8%).

Age

Locally, the proportion of adults with no formal qualifications increased with age, from around 7% of adults aged 20-24, compared to around a quarter (26%) of adults aged 60-64.

When it comes to gender, more working age females had a degree on Census Day than men.

Three in ten (30%) females aged 16-64 and just over one in four (26%) males aged 16-64 had a qualification at degree level or above.

Census 2021 Education by age.jpeg

CLICK TO ENLARGE: Highest level of educational qualification by age (adults aged 16-64) in percentage terms.

In contrast, around one in six (17%) males aged 16-64 had no formal qualifications in comparison to around one in eight (13%) females aged 16-64.

The same proportion (42%) of males and females aged 16-64 had secondary-level qualifications. Of these, around one in eight (13%) males aged 16-64 stated that their highest qualification was an NVQ (level 1,2 or 3). 

Census 2021 Education by sex.jpeg

CLICK TO ENLARGE: Highest level of educational qualification by sex (adults aged 16-64) in percentage terms.

By contrast, one in nine (11%) females aged 16-64 stated that their highest qualification was an NVQ.

Place of birth

Almost two-fifths (39%) of Jersey-born adults aged 16-64 had a degree qualification, slightly less than the proportion of all adults aged 16-64 (42%).

In contrast, one in nine (11%) Jersey-born adults aged 16-64 had no formal qualifications, less than the proportion of all adults aged 16-64 (15%) that held none.

Adults aged 16-64 born ‘Elsewhere in the world’ had the largest proportion (64%) of people with degree-level qualifications.

Just over half (54%) of adults aged 16-64 born in Portugal or Madeira had no formal qualifications compared to around a tenth (10%) of all other adults aged 16-64.

Census 2021 Education by place of birth.jpeg

CLICK TO ENLARGE: Highest level of educational qualification by place of birth (adults aged 16-64).

When it came to recent arrivals – those who have moved or returned to the island since 2015 - just over three-fifths (61%) of Jersey-born recent arrivals and two-thirds (67%) of those born ‘elsewhere in the world’ held a qualification at or above degree level.

Just under three-fifths of all recent arrivals (58%) had a higher-level education and around a sixth (14%) did not have any formal qualifications.

50% of recent arrivals born in Portugal or Madeira had no formal qualifications compared to 20% of Polish-born recent arrivals.

Occupation

When it came what jobs people did vis-à-vis their qualifications, over four-fifths (81%) of working-age adults employed in a professional occupation held a degree or equivalent.

Nearly two-thirds of working-age adults in finance services and law (65%) and over half of those in education, health and other services (54%) had a degree-level qualification.

Around three in ten workers in farming and fishing (30%) and construction and quarrying (27%) did not possess formal qualifications.

Census 2021 Education by occupation.jpeg

CLICK TO ENLARGE: Highest level of educational qualification by occupation (aged 16-64 and working) in percentage terms.

A quarter (25%) of workers in hotels, restaurants and bars did not have formal qualifications whereas almost three in ten (28%) possessed a degree-level qualification. A similar distribution was seen for those working in wholesale and retail trades.

Just over three-fifths (62%) of public sector workers possessed a higher-level qualification compared to around two-fifths (43%) of private sector workers.

Education is one of a series of bulletins that have been released on the 2021 Census. It revealed that the total resident population of Jersey last March was 103,267, which was 4,533 fewer people than than the last estimate of 107,800 in 2019.

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Comments

Comments on this story express the views of the commentator only, not Bailiwick Publishing. We are unable to guarantee the accuracy of any of those comments.

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Posted by Scott Mills on
sadly degree's simply don't have the weight they once had prior to the last 20 years. That's what happens when exams are dumbed down somewhat to allow "everyone access to univesity". While that is commendable, the result means the piece of paper at the end of studying degree level, isn't often enough. top 5% was once accepted by all universities but not now. Also most do not retirn to the island atter their studies, because they've seen the real world, rather than a nice beached island.
Posted by Keith Marsh on
One must ask WHY over 2,000 people were unemployed in Jersey; WHEN almost every shop window, and other Media outlets, there are adverts for STAFF WANTED.
Jersey has caught the "must have a degree" illness = WRONG.
Our small Island requires many people to do retail, agricultural, construction and similar roles, which are as important to Jersey than a degree in a non useful subject, purely because the person has no idea of what they want to do.
Higher Education is great, but it is not for everyone, or for our wonderful Island.
Posted by Richard Milner of leeds on
I do,hope that the unemployed are being properly pushed to get jobs and not going through interview farces that I have heard about. I hate to think of the money we waste paying out to people who don’t deserve it. The sort of people who have no intention of getting jobs.
If they are genuinely unemployable then fine.
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